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Clear Basic Science Fair Fun-Fact Project Guide: Science Experimental Methods & Development
© Donald Reinhardt, December 3, 2013
Science Fairs are interesting, exciting and fun.
Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Chenzira Mallory at Lajes Field Department of Defense Dependants School

Science fairs and science projects are good and challenging events. Science projects which are successful always require: good organization, critical and logical thinking, a command of the important facts, the ability to design experiments and to collect, order, present, summarize, discuss and answer questions about the experimental data. Our Clear Basic Science Fair Fun-Fact Project Guide at www. Sciencesuperschool.com is presented here with this link and can help anyone achieve a successful, fun and useful science project.

Science Fair Fun-Fact Project Guide – Seven Clear Basic Steps for Science Fair Project Success: Outline

These are the ideas and outline to have. Immediately after this outline we will do a full and complete discussion.

1. Choose a project or science idea that interests or excites you.

2. Formulate an observation or hypothesis that fits your project.

3. Design experiments to prove or disprove the formulated hypothesis.

4. Keep a Science Notebook and record all the Materials, Methods and Data Results.

5. Assemble your data into specific clear charts, graphs, photographs to clarify the findings.

6. Summarize the conclusions and explain how the hypothesis is supported or contradicted by the data.

7. Be prepared to answer any and all questions related to your project.

Seven Clear and Basic Steps for Science Fair Project Success – Expanded Insights and Ideas

Here the outline above is explained and developed.

1. Choose a Science Fair Project or science idea that interests or excites you

Project choice is a very important. If you choose a project you are really not interested in, then you really don’t experience the fun and adventure of science. If you choose something that interests you – something you think you will like – that helps you to be involved and enthusiastic. Such a project stimulates not only your interests but also your imagination, scientific questions and exploration. So, choose a project that interests you or stimulates your interest.

2. Formulate an observation or hypothesis that fits and defines your Science Fair Project

In science we always like to ask questions such as how, why, when or where. Scientists are very much like detectives who seek answers and solutions to questions. How do insects survive winter? Why is perpetual motion so difficult? How do we measure time and how different is a mechanical clock from a digital clock? How do cells reproduce? These are important questions that have been asked and have been solved. Sometimes we do different experiments to prove the same endpoint or result and at other times we do the same experiment to see if it really works and is repeatable. If we do an experiment over and over again and get the same outcome, then it often becomes a scientific and proven law. Gravity is real and proven to exist. Exactly what gravity really is and how we fully explain it is still a mystery. In conclusion, what is the scientific question to be asked? What is the hypothesis or statement to be proven or disproven?

3. Design experiments to prove or disprove the formulated Science Fair Project hypothesis

This is the fun and the imagination part in science – design and direct controlled experiments to determine what is happening and what factors and events are important. Remember that every experiment must have a control? Do you know what a control is and how it is useful?

4. Keep a Science Fair Project Notebook and record all the Materials, Methods, Data & Results

The Science Notebook is a very important part of science. Scientists cannot remember all the details of everything they do, so when they do experiments they write down everything that is important in their bound notebooks (not scraps of paper). The experiment number and the date and the time are the first part of any notebook data entry. Next will follow items such as those listed here (of course, this will vary and depends on the type experiment):

a.      What equipment was used such as thermometers, water baths, and dissection tools?

b.     What chemicals, if any, were used such as salt, water, acids, bases, pH indicators?

c.      How long were the exposure or test times and the exact start time and end time?

d.     All the data obtained are recorded: change in reaction rate, size, weight, volume, etc.

 
5. Assemble your scientific data into specific clear charts, graphs, photographs to clarify the Science Fair Project findings

This is really an exciting part where you get to display and present your findings. You show what happened when you did this or did that. What were the variables and how was the control that every experiment must have.

6. Summarize the Science Fair Project conclusions and explain how the hypothesis is supported or contradicted by the data

This is where you say what you have proven and what you have not proven. You may have uncovered some new mysteries that need further explanation. Remember your science project has been your own personal adventure and you have taken that adventure and are a better person and a scientist for having done so.

7. Be prepared to answer any and all questions related to your Science Fair project.
There are judges at all Science Fairs and these are basically real scientists and teachers who have an interest in what you have done. So, be happy and be prepared to talk about your interesting science project. Yes, note the bold emphasis here. What you want to do is be interested, show interest and get them involved in your insights and excitement. You are like a salesperson of the scientific truth. See what I have discovered. At first I thought this and then I found that. Isn't that amazing? You get the point. And remember, you know more about what you did than anyone else, so go ahead and tell the story and tell it well. 
The judges might ask you:
Why did you choose this project?

What was the hardest part of the project?

What did you really prove or show?

Does this project have any practical or human importance?
What do you plan to do next?
Be prepared, don't worry and have fun because science is fun and a great learning experience. Fun and learning together make a great combination, don't you think?